Lighting up the living room and seeing the rooms finally take shape

Today over lunch we admitted to each other that right before the renovation started, we each had a private moment of “Should we really tear this house apart?” Obviously it didn’t stop us, and we agreed that it was still the right choice. Looking at these before photos is only further reassurance that some things needed to change in our space to make us happy and comfortable.

If you’ve been reading the blog for any length of time, you know we like light. The living room we inherited was a light-filled paradise during the day… but at night the sole source of light was a lonely, off center ceiling fan.

We actually loved the chevron slat ceiling, but the set up left us with very few options to get power to (much needed) new lights.

We brainstormed quite a bit – considering things like replicating the light fixtures we made in the living room and captain’s bedroom in the firehouse, but ultimately we decided recessed lighting would be the best solution. To install this, it required dropping the ceiling slightly in order to add cross pieces for the fixtures and drywall to attach to.

The finished result is crisp, clean goodness… which I couldn’t show you without revealing all of the drywall. A few notes on that: The original plan for the renovation had Aaron doing everything but the exterior stucco repair. We found a great local guy to help with that and he also offered to subcontract the drywall. Thanks to an unexpectedly nice tax return, we opted to hire that work out. The crew did all of the drywall work on the walls and ceiling (including hanging it) AND smoothed our ceilings in the kitchen, dining room and hallway in about a week. This saved us a ton of time in the overall plan and was worth EVERY FREAKING PENNY.

So I figured we’d take a tour through all of the spaces via a set of before and afters. Ready?!?

This view changed dramatically after removing the built ins, adding the new French doors and smoothing the ceiling.

Boom Sauce.

Flipping around – This view is crazy thanks to our furniture sitting sideways in the space. The built ins, paneling and fireplace mantle were nixed.

Looking toward the kitchen from the living room, here’s a pretty good before shot of the bar, which we said “bye bye” to. That’s a major change, but so is opening the wall behind the fridge and microwave/oven.

Mama likey!

Here’s a reminder of what the kitchen used to look like.

We left the laundry area where it was and built a wall, shortening the kitchen from this direction. This will be a U shaped kitchen with the range at the back of the space, sink to the right (in a similar spot as it started) and 500 miles of countertops (approximately).

Here’s a look at that wall we cut in half to open this space to the front of the house.

These night photos don’t do justice to the amount of light that streams through the space from the front door and front windows.

Shrinking the kitchen from one side was only possible because we stole this dining area for a pantry.

We will take a peek inside later when there’s something to see.

I think I saved the best for last. This door is directly ahead when you enter the house. It used to be an entrance to the kitchen…

Now it houses the much needed, much loved laundry room!

Looking at these before photos and then living in our new space, any doubts about tearing this space up are completely and utterly erased.

The madness of midway (and a video)

The best thing I can say about the demolition phase of this renovation is that it is over. It really is madness to take most of your house down the studs, essentially live in your master suite, wash dishes in your guest bathroom tub, cook on a camp stove, and (for a few weeks) do laundry on your patio. Madness.

In the spirit of documenting and sharing, I thought it was still worth sharing a few shots of the house midway through the renovation.

Walking into the house, the intrusive pantry is gone, as is most of the drywall around the kitchen. You can start to see the front-to-back view we’ll have when this wall gets cut in half.

Here’s a better shot of the kitchen, and it’s pretty empty at this point. We did a little extra demo by pulling down the entire ceiling, rather than removing the soffit and patching where it had been. The lights still work though, which means this space has 100% more light than the future dining room has ever had. So there’s that.

Staring straight into the kitchen (and future laundry room) the space feels simultaneously huge (thanks to everything being gone) and small (we’re putting a whole kitchen here?!?). Don’t forget that the space behind where I’m standing will be a huge wall of cabinets and a hidden pantry.

This view of the living room doesn’t even look that crazy. The drywall is almost out, but we haven’t even removed the slider yet (but we have decided not to keep it, per my earlier post). The carpet (and the hodgepodge of tile below) is on its way out.

This view is a bit crazier, showing the drywall we pulled from the upper part of the wall. That will eventually get recovered, but it did give us easy access to the corner of the attic where previous owners and contractors decided to leave rolls of insulation other non-essential building materials. Clean out commenced pre-drywall replacement. #RenovationIsGlamorous

The problem with these types of photos is the chaos. It’s really hard to take in what we’re planning. So once the walls were in place and the form was taking shape, I did a video tour to give you a better feel for the space.

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A few notes

  • Yay walls!
  • I mention the washer and dryer will stack. I failed to mention that we decided to buy a new washer. Our dryer is new enough that the washer pair was available. So we’re not stacking our existing set…. which wouldn’t work….
  • The pantry still feels a little crazy here… buy trust that it all makes sense later.
  • I mentioned the need to address the ceiling to add lights. That’s a great set up for our next post, which will be that PLUS (thanks to the magic of the internet) ALL OF THE DRYWALL!!!

 

SIde note: If you’re still out there reading this – thank you. I know this whole transition from a super cool firehouse to a California ranch has been odd, and then I basically disappeared for months. Renovations were slow thanks to Aaron spending all of last fall in the Midwest. Once things got rolling my job became utterly insane. If I wasn’t working in the evening, I was completely exhausted and it’s hard for me to be verbose and witty whilst tired. The work pace may not let up, but we’ve got SO many things to show you and I’m energized by the progress we’ve made! All that to say (again), thanks for sticking around and checking in to our little corner of the internet.

Half the house renovation plan

When I say that we’re knee deep in this renovation, what I really mean is Aaron is exhausted from laying floors and I don’t recognize these before pictures anymore. The space has already undergone such a huge change and I can’t wait to share it with you! Let’s dive into all the goodies: before photos, an overview of our plans, floorplans and a video.

I’ve owed you a decent floorplan for a while, so here’s a look at the half of the house under renovation. Gray boxes are cabinets/built ins.

Items of note

  • The awkward pantry at the end of the hall
  • The laundry in the kitchen
  • The near lack of wall space in the living room thanks to an abundance of built ins and doors

 

Let’s dive into what the house looks like IRL. Here’s the view from the entry.

Straight ahead is a door to the kitchen and the ill placed pantry that turns the hallway into an awkward L. You won’t be surprised to hear that the pantry has to go.

Turning to the right, the kitchen sits behind the wall where the bar is. We are definitely planning to open this wall up.

Turning more to the right, gives you a full view of the front living room.

This is actually a pretty large space. To give you a sense, the desk is 10′. We absolutely love the corner window bank with the wide sills. We’re planning to turn this space into our dining room. We’ll add lighting (recessed and a slim custom chandelier) and paint (white for the walls, emerald green for the window nook).

Walking into the space and turning right again, you’re facing the front of the house.

This room is actually big enough to hold more than just a dining table. The corner next to the entry will become a casual seating area with a bar (the cart for now, a custom install later).

Now we’ve turned right again (basically we’re anti NASCAR-ing it up in here), facing the entry, coat closet and the back of the pantry.

You can start to see that we’re working with miles of carpet and some not-our-style (though what would be?) linoleum (in the entry and kitchen). All of this is getting pulled in favor of wood flooring throughout the entire house.

Turning right (yet again) you can see how this room flows into the existing dining area and back to the living room.

We haven’t arrived at the kitchen yet, but you may have noticed from the floorplan that it is rather compact and, as I mentioned, it has the laundry area. Changes need to be made!

In order to expand, we needed the space currently dedicated as “dining.”  One other key element when considering where to put things: we didn’t want to trench in order to add plumbing. That meant the washing machine and kitchen sink would need to stay relatively close to their current home.

Establishing that we wanted to absorb this space into the kitchen, yielded another challenge: how to effectively rework the space so it felt open, but not like it was cut in half by a large walkway (which is the current vibe.) I’m telling you all of this from this angle because it’s easiest to envision the pantry that we’re going to make. We’re taking some of the space from to post to the right as pantry and then adding floor to ceiling cabinets in front of it. This will give us a huge amount of storage and shrink the walkway to a more reasonable size in the kitchen.

All of that space behind the table will be PANTRY!!

Dining room aka FUTURE PANTRY

Flipping around, you get a view into the kitchen and a peek at the laundry area. Let’s take a quick look at the compact kitchen, then step back here to talk about our plans.

Yep – that’s a laundry area taking up valuable real estate…

Ok, so now you know what we had. It’s all going.

Literally every single thing in this space, including the soffits. We’ll build a wall between the kitchen and laundry area (remember those appliances have to stay close to where they are – no trenching) to give the washer and dryer a dedicated room. Then we’ll open as much as we can to the left and right to expose the kitchen to the adjoining rooms. We’ll be left with a U-shaped kitchen of lower cabinets, with a range range centered on the far wall and miles of new countertops!

Turing right from the view above, you get a look at part of the living room.

The footprint for this room is rather large, but as the floorplan demonstrates, this space has a lot of awkward built ins, exterior doors (3) and wood paneling.

To get some much needed wall space, we’re moving the existing slider and replacing it with an existing window. We’re also planning to remove all of the paneling and drywall in this space. We just couldn’t get past how nice the walls would look as one continuous surface. The paneling isn’t our style and, unfortunately, the previous owner textured the drywall above it, making it impossible to match. Going back to the studs will allow for an easier rework of the electrical in this room and give us a chance to re-insulate with more modern materials.

Stepping into the space and turning left offers this view

We absolutely loved the vaulted ceilings and we don’t mind the chevron wood slats… though we will surprise no one by saying the ceiling could use a good coat of white paint. The ceiling fan is the only light in this space and in the evening I want to die a little. We compensate by leaving all of the kitchen lights on all the time. All that to say we need to figure out how to get more overhead light and that may (spoiler alert – WILL) affect the final design of the ceiling.

This also gives you a good view of the bar that backs to the kitchen (aka the reason our couch… really any couch… won’t fit in this space.) All of the built ins are getting pulled. In the future, this wall will hold the slider and the entrance to our backyard. Reorienting was important, because eventually this will open to our outdoor dining area.

The view from the opposite side of the space:

This gives you a good look at the awesome MCM fireplace… and the rest of the built ins. The fireplace stays basically as is. We’ll remove the mantel and refinish the hearth to cover up the leaf imprints, which you can see better in the photo below. Once the room is cleared, the couch will face this direction. We’ll add shelves to the left of the fireplace and a screen/projector combo for maximum TV viewing that can be hidden away when not in use.

And to round it all out, here’s the view from the family room, through the dining room to the front room:

Let’s steer back to the floorplan, with a view of where we were:

And where we’re going:

Does your chest feel lighter looking at the open space in the family room once all the built ins are out… or is that just me?

With this layout, I feel like photos and floor plans are only so helpful. So I’ve made a truly awkward iPhone video tour of the space. (You’re welcome?)

 

A few notes:

  • I made this video on Jan 15 (my birthday!) and it’s funny to hear how the plans have evolved since then. I mention that we “think the front room will become the dining area.” Obviously, based on the notes above we’ve settled that.
  • We are not taking out the half wall in the entry. Aaron’s assessment of the post is that it is built “strangely.” We decided that losing that half wall was not worth the effort it would take to make sure the house is still structurally sound… which seems rather important.
  • Not sure why I sound super nervous…
  • We actually decided to leave the deep freeze in the garage for now and just put shelves in the pantry. More on that later when we get into the details of all the individual spaces.
  • Seriously, I sound like I am panting

 

So that’s (mostly) where we started. Obviously we’re adjusting and refining as we go. We’ll start to dive into the details and finishing choices (like the AHmazing floors Aaron is installing this week) in the upcoming posts.