Furniture swaps

It feels like we’ve been waiting forever for the studio tipping point – the point when we actually move in, the point when the dining room starts to get cleared out, the point when we think “YES! This is why we bought this place.” I’m seriously enjoying the fact that it feels like we’re moving in. Nesting is at an all time high.

So it’s no shock that some unexpected furniture swaps have me doing a happy dance. First we moved our desks into the studio, freeing up space in the upstairs living room.

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At the same time, we moved everything into the viewing, freeing up a media unit that has always lived in the studio. Our initial impulse was to sell it, but we decided to try it out in the upstairs living room first.

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It turned out to be a great fit. We love that the TV is lower and therefore more in our line of sight from the couch.

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This freed up the record cabinet turned media cabinet/bar turned put-the-TV-on-there-for-now. We plopped it down where the desks used to sit and promptly filled it with all our bar parephenalia.

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It also gave us a chance to fill and display the decanters we’ve been collecting. Ultimately these will probably live in a bar downstairs, but it’s nice to use some of the fun things we own.

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Now the upstairs living room looks like this.

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It’s so much less “maybe you should do some work” and so much more “Relax! Have a drink!” Even the view from the stairs is better. Hello wide open goodness.

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This, however, is my favorite view. Looking down the hallway from the bedrooms, all you see is living room furniture instead of our cluttered desks. It makes me happy on the daily.

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Moving the alcohol back to the record cabinet freed up the white Ikea cubes and they suddenly looked like good temporary night stands.

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So now, we have bedside tables! Beside tables that are not made of cardboard and threatening to cave in!

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They’re definitely temporary, but the kind of temporary we can live with until we actually get to redo this room. Of course, I couldn’t leave well enough alone. I grabbed one of our favorite lamps and pulled out gobs of milk glass to hold my jewelry.

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There’s something about a jewelry in a retail display that makes my heart happy.

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The closet, former home of jewelery stuck in plastic trays and piles of Aaron’s belts and watches, also got some milk glass. My inner storage geek rejoiced.

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Can I get a ‘hooray’ for finally feeling a bit more settled?!?

18 comments

  1. Meaghan

    How do you know if milk glass is real or just random white-milk-glass-looking stuff? I see what i think might be milk glass a lot a thrift stores and would liove to get some, but I’m afraid i would be buying junk instead of the real stuff…any tips?

    • Heather

      Well, I don’t really have a background in it. You can tell it’s older when it’s not as white. If it’s bright white then it’s just white glass. Besides that I’ve just bought pieces I like because of the shape. And the white-ness also goes with our aesthetic 🙂 Sorry I can’t be more helpful.

    • Mel

      Hi…catching up on DIY greatness and noticed your comment! I’ve been collecting milk and depression glass since I was six, courtesy of my Gran, so I’ll share some of her hand-me-down tips! Milk glass will fluoresce around the rim when held up to direct light. You should get shimmers of red, orange and blue-green, like an opal, and it will be slightly less opaque than plain white glass. Hobnailed patterns are also extremely common (although they can be found on modern-cast pieces too, using old molds). Basically a good rule of thumb is not to buy a piece you don’t like just because you think it’s authentic (it might not be) or antique (it probably isn’t, a majority of milk glass was cast within the last 50 years). And definitely don’t pay more than $15-20, even for a larger piece you really like. The oldest/rarest pieces I have in my collection are a pair of hobnail Delphite candlestick-holders circa 1934, and they’re only worth about $50.

      • Heather

        Thanks for the input! I definitely just buy mine for the love of a particular piece. Aaron is my barometer for what is white vs what has tinted slightly. I think the only piece I’ve spent real money on (more than $20) is a hobnail cake stand, which was very hard to find.

  2. Kati from so happy home

    I love, love, love your mix of industrial, modern, vintage, and heirloom. It’s so great when a piece you love, that you thought was going to have to be out of your life, turns out to fit perfectly somewhere else. Nice progress, woman! Ok, and man. And dog. And probably some family and friends from time to time.

    Oh, speaking of entertaining, how do you guys identify your brown liquors once they’re in their decanters? We are nearing three decanters (one is en route as we speak), two of which are identical, with similar colored whiskeys that are just itching to be displayed in them. Do you label them? Do you just ‘know’? Spill. Ok, don’t spill, but, elaborate, please.

    • Heather

      Thanks, friend! It’s nice to see our style actually coming out 🙂

      Aaron claims to know which liquor is which and also claims that if he forgets he can just smell them. Not being a brown liquor connoisseur, I trust him. Left to my own devices I would probably create a cheat sheet nothing the shape of the bottle and the contents 🙂

  3. Cheryl

    It totally looks like this was the grand plan from the beginning – all the pieces look like they belong in their current location. I love it when a plan comes together and you get to use your beloved stuff!

    I was also wondering how you tell which liquor is which. I’ve seen rather generic silver labels for decanters but I’m guessing you would need to be more specific than gin, vodka, whiskey (can’t remember the fourth one).

    • Heather

      It’s nice when that happens even if it’s not intentional 🙂 We like all of those pieces for a reason so it’s kind of fun to see them in action in different areas.

      Aaron’s steel trap of a mind is keeping track. If it were just me, I’d have to make some sort of cheat sheet 🙂

  4. Lisa @ The Meaning of Me

    Clever girl. 🙂 Nice changes. I love how “old movie” the record cabinet/bar is. I kind of expect Cary Grant to pop in for a drink. Love the milk glass – my Mom had a few pieces years ago which passed to me and then…passed on. If I had known you then, I totally would have sent them your way.

    • Heather

      Thanks! the record cabinet redo is one of my favorite things. It’s probably our most treasured piece of furniture.

      Oh milk glass! I just love that it’s white and simple. It fits with our aesthetic. No worries. I’m sure you found a good home for it 🙂

  5. Brad H

    Just an FYI. I’m a decanter junkie as well. But in doing research as I bought some more, I was informed that you should NOT leave any alcohol in them if they are Leaded Crystal. The liquor will break down the crystal and allow the lead to contaminate the liquor over time before you drink it. . . . .

    I still love mine but if you aren’t going through it quickly just an FYI… Not to be a party pooper because they look awesome.

  6. mary

    In the photo of the tv on the new white media stand, I like that the flower in the far left vase
    is raising his leaf hands in a ‘wahoo!”
    Even your accessories are overjoyed! Looks great!

  7. Steph H.

    I love how well Mojo coordinates with your studio! I love your mix of different styles too. That is totally my style as well, and I am itching so bad to get out of our rental so I can start making a house more of a home!

    • Heather

      Hahaha – we like black and white, even in our pets 😉
      Thanks! It’s nice to see some of our style actually coming out. Oooh! Are you actively looking for a home?

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