Building floors in the pole closets

The firehouse came with 5 pole holes and just one pole. (I feel like there’s a potential dirty joke in there, but haven’t had enough wine to figure out exactly what it is…)

Because 4 human-sized, holes that will literally let you fall to your death is too many for one residence, they were near the top of our repair list. They zoomed up even further when we realized that they would be easier to work on while we had the rented scissor lift in our possession. As a bonus, finishing the bottom side would allow for an even coverage of paint on the studio side.

Three of the holes had questionable floors. If you put just a bit of weight on the floor, you could definitely feel it give. We assumed low-grade plywood was to blame, but we found out it was actually due to large metal plates. Seen here above ground:

003poleclosetfloor

We left one of these plates intact in the 4th bedroom because there was literally no way to get it out thanks to furnace pipes. That space will always be a closet so there’s no chance for someone to hang out there. The metal plate will do for that area, but we wanted a bit more support in the other bedrooms where we have plans to remove the pole closets.

Let’s take a look at what we’re working with. Looking up from the studio:

001poleclosetfloor

Looking down from our bedroom:

002poleclosetfloor

Imminent death:

004poleclosetfloor

Aaron started by attaching 2″ x 6″ ledgers to 3 sides. The glazed brick is hollow so there was no reason to add a ledger there because it wouldn’t be structural.

005poleclosetfloor

006poleclosetfloor

The floor is solid concrete so he used a hammer drill to make way for heavy-duty concrete anchors, which hold the ledger boards in place.

007poleclosetfloor

That is the official hammer drill face…

Actually, he did have a bit of a scare on the very last hole. In the midst of drilling one of the holes, sparks flew back out of the hole and a run of lighting in the studio went dead. Thank god for circuit breakers. Apparently, there was conduit in the concrete ceiling. The firehouse has so many treasures and secrets… Luckily he was able to identify which circuit was compromised and was able to disable it before the break. So it’s all good now, but it was not a good day in firehouse work.

Anyways, from there he basically built a mini-deck in each opening, squaring up the corners and adding joists.

008poleclosetfloor

010poleclosetfloor

This floor isn’t going anywhere. Looking up from the studio:

011poleclosetfloor

012poleclosetfloor

He added drywall on the studio side. Eventually the top sides will get insulation and plywood, which will sit flush with the concrete so we can run new flooring over it … whenever we get to that… in like 5 years…

Also, eventually we’ll drag those metal plates to the dumpster… it’s only been 3 weeks since this was done… have I mentioned this blog is a judgement-free zone?

013poleclosetfloor

Final shot looking up from the studio.

014poleclosetfloor

Only 2 more posts until I show you the rest of the space. Two more posts! Two more posts! Ok… now I’ve had enough wine…

 

5 comments

  1. Pingback: Viewing room – this will make sense when it’s done |
  2. Charlotte

    It would honestly kill me to block over those! All I can do now is picture a fireman’s pole in my bedroom and I feel like a 5 year old. 🙁 on another note your home is unbelievable, would be such a dream to live in a place with so much character and history.

    Oh, and have you ever tried the dining room pole??

    • Heather

      Ha! If the poles were still intact we definitely would have left them. As they were, they were much more hazard than 5-year-old fun.

      We have yet to go down the dining room pole. It needs to be reattached and it just hasn’t been high on our priority list. I’m guessing we’ll get it attached before our first open house (which will hopefully be this fall).

  3. Pingback: Taking stock – updates to the grand plan |

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